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Saint Rictrudis

Saint Rictrudis

Culture Group: French
Culture: French
Date: 13th century–15th century
Medium: Polychrome and gilding on wood
Dimensions:
31 1/2 x 9 3/8 x 8 1/2 inches (80 x 23.8 x 21.6 cm)
sculpture excluding attached wood platform base: 30 5/8 x 8 x 8 inches (77.8 x 20.3 x 20.3 cm)
Classification: Sculpture
Credit Line: The Brummer Collection
Label Text:This statue portrays Saint Rictrudis, whose name in Latin is abbreviated on the statue’s base with the text “pray for us” in French. Dressed in the dark blue habit and white wimple of a nun, she holds a crook in one hand and small building in the other, both of which identify her as the founding abbess of her convent.

Rictrudis was born in southern France in the early seventh century. As a young woman she met Adalbald, a northern noble, who had come to extend Frankish control and defend the region from Basque raiders. They married against her family’s wishes and moved to Flanders where they had four children and became examples of piety by caring for the poor and endowing religious institutions. On a journey to the south, Rictrudis’s family murdered Adalbald. She refused the king’s demands that she remarry, preferring instead to take the veil and enter the convent at Marchiennes that the couple had founded. She, Adalbald, and their four children, each of whom also took holy orders, were beatified (made saints) due to their religious devotion.


Provenance: Henri Daguerre, Paris; purchased 1958 by Ernest [1890-1964] or Joseph [1883-1947] Brummer; by inheritance to Ernest Brummer's wife, Ella Brummer; purchased 1966 by Duke University Museum of Art, now Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University.
Object number: 1966.19.1